SLiCE Engagement Programs: PRAXIS

The purpose of PRAXIS is to support students interested in developing a community service or action project that is innovative, creative, and change oriented. PRAXIS allows students the opportunity to put their passion into action by providing them with resources, training, and support to develop their ideas and implement their projects.

PRAXIS is a two-semester commitment. In addition to implementing the project, students participate in leadership training and service-learning experiences.

To ensure that the PRAXIS project meets a genuine community need, students must collaborate with a local community partner (e.g., non-profit agency) to develop their PRAXIS proposal. For assistance finding a community partner, stop by the SLiCE office in the Lory Student Center.

APPLY FOR PRAXIS TODAY!

Everything you Need to Know About PRAXIS

The Lory Student Center at Colorado State University

PRAXIS Proposals


Discover

PRAXIS = Learning in Action: Make Your Service Projects a Reality

Do you have a passion to create change in your community?

Do you have a service project or program idea that you want to make a reality?

“PRAXIS” is defined as reflection and action upon the world in order to transform it.” —Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

The purpose of PRAXIS is to support students interested in developing a community service or action project that is innovative, creative, and change oriented. PRAXIS allows students the opportunity to put their passion into action by providing them with resources, training, support, and up to $2,000 in grant funds to develop their ideas and implement their projects. PRAXIS is a two to four semester commitment. In addition to implementing the project, students participate in leadership training and service-learning experiences. PRAXIS will support any aspect of service and/or change.  As long as your project is creative, specific and structured, your idea will be considered!

PRAXIS Frequently Asked Questions

What is Praxis?

“PRAXIS” is defined as reflection and action upon the world in order to transform it. —Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed

How much is typically funded?

Grants can be up to $2000, but typically range between $500 and $1000. PRAXIS funds cannot be used as a stipend to pay students for their work. Funds are typically used for marketing, materials, volunteer recruitment and program development.

What are the criteria of a PRAXIS project?

Project leaders must be graduate or undergraduate students at CSU. The project must benefit the community and be a new project or a major improvement or innovation on an existing project. Long-term projects with a plan for sustainability beyond the initial two semesters will receive priority in funding. Projects must be service or action oriented, not simply fundraising or a one time event.

What are the requirements of a PRAXIS project?

In addition to receiving grant money, PRAXIS provides students with leadership training, service-learning experience, and community development skills.

Project teams will participate in five PRAXIS experiences over the course of the academic year: two evening leadership training retreats, a learning circle prior to implementing the project, a reflection circle after completion of the project, and the PRAXIS showcase.

Leadership training retreats

Students will participate in leadership training retreats that will cover topics such as developing project goals, building coalitions, fundraising and budgeting, recruiting members, and sustaining projects into the future.

Learning circle

Learning circles are small discussion groups of students, community members, and faculty that take place before implementation of the PRAXIS project. The purpose of the learning circle is to create a common understanding around the issue or problem being addressed by the project.

Reflection circle

Reflection circles take place after the completion of the PRAXIS project, allowing participants to look critically at their experiences and translate those experiences into learning.

PRAXIS Showcase

The PRAXIS Showcase is an opportunity to share the project and its results with other students, faculty, staff, and community members in an informal setting.  Following the presentations, students will be recognized for their leadership and contributions to the community.

What makes a successful PRAXIS project?

Step 1: Pick your passion

Identify an issue or problem that you care deeply about and want to change. Issues can be local, national, or global in scope but must affect the Fort Collins community in some tangible way. Examples of local issues include housing/homelessness, health, drugs/alcohol, transportation, and working with special populations like senior citizens, youth, and people with disabilities. Some national issues with local impact include environmental sustainability and immigration.

Step 2: Collaborate with a community partner

Identify a community organization (e.g., local non-profit, government agency, faith based organization) that works on the issue/problem and contact them. If you need help identifying an agency, please call or stop by the SLICE office. Explain the PRAXIS concept to the agency and discuss potential projects that could address the issue/problem.

Step 3: Determine a project

In consultation with your community partner, create a project plan that is innovative and action-oriented. The following are example PRAXIS projects:

A youth community garden project aimed at promoting environmental sustainability

  • A financial literacy program for high school seniors
  • Cross-denominational dialogue groups
  • Construction projects that increase access for the disabled
  • Educational campaigns about alcohol and drugs
  • Conflict-resolution training programs for disadvantaged youth

Please note that preference will be given to projects that are structured, sustainable and specific (e.g., have the potential to last for more than the 2012-13 academic year). Fundraisers, political campaigns, and projects that have the potential to cause harm will not be funded.

Step 4: Complete the application

Fill out the online application. If you need assistance completing the application, please contact Jenn Rieskamp at 970-491-5488 or by email.