The LSC at Sea: Welcoming, Affirming & Engaging

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Executive Director of the Lory Student Center Mike Ellis took the 2018 Spring Semester to voyage around the world as the Dean of Student Life  on the Semester at Sea ‘s ship The World Odyssey 

by Jayla Hodge

 

 Running a building as large and as functional as the Lory Student Center is no small task. While the responsibility is held by many departments, the symbolical captain of the LSC is its Executive Director. Mike Ellis has served as the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Executive Director of Lory Student Center  for more than 18 years. He is an essential part of the LSC and Colorado State community, and this past semester, he made a bold move – to voyage around the world with Semester at Sea.

Leaving a landlocked mentality, his home, and his role at Colorado State behind was no easy feat. While it was a smooth semester here at the LSC without the director, he was still missed. Now he has returned home with new experiences, lessons, and tales from 11 countries, 14 cities and four continents. And he is ready to share.

 

Photos by Maria Ellis-at the Great Wall of China

Life at Sea

In the beginning of January, Ellis, with his wife and son, packed their bags, locked up their house, and said goodbye to their dog. After a year of preparation, they were on their way to San Diego to embark on a Semester at Sea voyage.

“My interest was the opportunity to travel all around the world with students. I had the opportunity to listen and see the world through the eyes of students, students from different parts of the world themselves,” he said.

He would also play a responsible role onboard The World Odyssey as the Dean of Student Life, a job with duties not much different than his back at the LSC.

“The skills and experiences I have were all transferable. The ship itself is like a Lory Student Center but on the water,” Ellis said. “The mission on the ship was to welcome, engage, and affirm every single student, and I like to think that’s the same mission for the Lory Student Center, that every student that comes through the doors is welcomed, affirmed, and engaged in some capacity within the CSU community.”

The voyage was 101 days and approximately half of that was spent on the ship covering about 28,000 nautical miles. The other half was in port at 13 land locations.

“People start to refer to the ship as a port, it becomes the ’14th’ port in a way. The ship itself definitely became a favorite port of mine. The comfort, the people, and the learning that occurs with this incredible group of people from across the world make it amazing,”Ellis said.

Letting go to Embrace Life

Letting go and living in the moment was a central theme in Ellis’s journey. He even partook in the King Neptune Day celebrations and a line crossing ceremony that involves the tradition of shaving your head when you cross the equator. He didn’t just shave his own head, but the heads of other students. Talk about letting go.

Even with so much adventure and excitement, there are always challenges that come with big adjustments.

“The biggest challenge for me was just being away from the normal everyday life. There is a period of time where you just have to let that go. Just allowing myself to be immersed  in the moment and not think about what’s happening back at home, on campus, or what’s going on in the Student Center. It was not an easy thing to do.”Ellis said the experience of visiting the Great Wall of China really embodied the essence of his travels.

“We were hiking with a group of students for two days along the Great Wall. It was incredible. As we stood on top of it, I just pinched myself and said, ‘Wow, am I really standing here?’ It was something I never thought I would do in my life,” he said.

 

 

Lessons From the Voyage

 

Coming from a small community like Fort Collins to larger cities and countries around the world such as Ghana, South Africa, Mauritius, India, Myanmar, Vietnam, China, Japan, Morocco, and Portugal as a bit of a culture shock for Ellis. During his time as a seafarer, he said he came across both positive and negative experiences. 

“There were experiences where you would have this mix of emotions – watching happiness in people’s eyes and knowing the privilege we have living in the U.S. that we don’t always recognize until you go to a place like that, and see children living in proverty,” Ellis said. “It’s hard trying to figure out how to carry that, especially in a way that actually makes a difference.”

There were students from 48 states and more than 35 countries. For students, coming from different cultures and walks of life, the power of the trip was to see and experience a wide range of cultures, and for them to grasp the privilege of being able to do so from a ship like The World Odyssey, Ellis said.

“Just the ability to be on a ship of that magnitude sailing around the world brings with it privilege that we had as participants and voyagers on the ship that others living in those countries did not have. I think whether students want to acknowledge it or not, they had to by just being present. That also includes nonstudents like myself.”

 

 

“It is possible for anyone that has the desire, ambition, and creativity to put together resources to sail around the world. You have to do it; you have to experience it. The vitality and perspective, it’s an investment worth doing.” 

The biggest lesson of all: You never know as much as you think you know about people and places until you get there and experience it. Ellis emphasized that everyone, and particularly students, should take the opportunity to travel and to truly expand their world perspective.

“Going back to the Great Wall story. It was a relatively short time and there were millions of people involved. You could read about [the Great Wall] all you want, but until you get there and see it you don’t comprehend the magnitude,” Ellis said enthusiastically. “I think this is true with so many different things, whether it is the Great Wall or children playing in Ghana, to see and experience the people, to touch it, smell it, to hear it, just everything. You can’t get it any other way.”

 

 Details of the Voyage

The ship, The World Odyssey, consisted of nine decks, including an engine room, kitchens and storage, the Captain’s Bridge, recreational areas, meeting rooms, and sleeping cabins. Just imagine – the LSC on the water – only with sleeping cabins and surrounded by the sea! CSU’s Principles of Community served as a grounding philosophy for the Student Life team, with a goal of “welcoming, engaging, and affirming” every single student on the ship, not unlike their mission at the LSC.

By the numbers:

    • 101 days
    • 536 students
    • 77 faculty and staff
    • 177 crew
    • 13 ports, 11 countries, 14 cities and 4 continents
    • Students from 48 states, 33 countries and 193 universities
    • $2.5 million in financial aid awarded

 

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Ram Head Fountain and Water Fountain Quotes Milestones

Featured Milestones

Locations: North side of Sutherland Community Garden, above major water fountains near restrooms

Ram Head Fountain

Housed in Sutherland Community Garden, in the northwest corner of the Lory Student Center Courtyard, are three Ram Head Fountains that were part of the original building, which was constructed in 1962. Initially there were seven Ram Heads, but four were damaged over the years. The current sculptures were preserved during the LSC renovation for inclusion in the Courtyard. The Ram Heads are hand carved and were designed by the same man who created the original Venetian Glass Tiles installations now adorning the Main Staircase.

 

Water Fountain Quotes

There are a total of seven Water Fountain Quotes throughout the revitalized LSC that display individual quotes from many of Colorado State’s distinguished presidents. The Water Fountain Quotes serve as a way to commemorate the University’s influential leaders. In recent years, additional Water Fountain Quotes have been added to include quotes from vice presidents.

  • Level 100 west bathrooms across from the Ramskeller, quote by 1st President Elijah E. Edwards
  • Level 200 west entrance bathrooms, quote by 12th President Albert C. Yates
  • Level 20 west/east corridor bathrooms across from the Information Desk, quote by 14th President Tony Frank
  • Level 200 LSC Theatre restrooms, quote by 1st Vice President of Diversity Mary Ontiveros
  • Level 200 south entrance across from Intermissions coffee shop, Quote by Vice President of Student Affairs Blanche Hughes
  • Level 300 across down central hallway past the SDPS offices, quote by 8th President William E. Morgan
  • Level 300 bathrooms and fountains beginning if the hall next to the event planning offices, quote by 5th President Charles A. Lory

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Get to know the LSC Brand Markers: University Seal and Extension

Featured Brand Markers

Location: South Exterior Wall of Ballroom C, South Exterior Wall of Ballroom A

Colorado State University Seal reflects Land-Grant Mission

The CSU Seal closely resembles the state of Colorado seal, but the University’s seal includes the words education, service, extension, and research that highlight  attributes the University finds most reflective of the land-grant mission. Both seals contain the eye of god within a pyramid, which is placed above a bundle of elm rods bound together with a projecting axe blade. The axe blade represents strength, authority, and leadership; qualities that both CSU and the state of Colorado have identified as important in their dedication to progress.

Since its founding in 1870, CSU has experienced a few name changes. Colorado Agricultural College welcomed its first students in 1879, and by 1935, the University was known as Colorado State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (Colorado A&M). Eventually the school was renamed in 1957 to Colorado State University, and offered a diverse curriculum and more advanced degrees.

 

Extension Services:

In 1879, the Extension Services of Colorado State University were established as early off-campus farmers’ institutions. Throughout the century, services provided by Extension Services have been essential to the survival of the communities within the state, especially during the Great Depression. Extension Services has created programs through a combination of local and federal government aid, and helped with the the dissemination of important agricultural and home economic information that improved the quality of life throughout the state. By attending to the issues of rural populations, projects like the Human Wildlife Interaction Program and Water Management Project prove that the effects of the CSU’s Extension Services have been far-reaching.

 

 

Land-Grant Wall and Lincoln Mural

Featured Milestones

 

Level 200, near the Food Court; and along West Staircase – Lory Student Center

Land-Grant Wall and Lincoln Mural – Lory Student Center

The Morrill Act, proposed by Vermont Senator Justin Smith Morrill, was ground-breaking legislation signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862. It created the nation’s Land-Grant University system. According to the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, these institutions focused on teaching agriculture, military tactics, science and mechanical arts, as well as classical studies, which included the study of language, literature, history, and art of ancient cultures. Land-Grant Universities were originally created as engines of the American Dream; they created access to educational opportunities for all citizens of all classes.

Colorado State, Colorado’s only land-grant institution, celebrated the Act’s 150th anniversary in 2012. The Lincoln and Land-Grant Walls, located in the Lory Student Center, pay tribute to this act and the University’s history. Colorado State is still defined as a modern day land-grant college with prominent programs in agriculture, biology, veterinary medicine, chemistry, and many other programs that have helped establish CSU as a world-renowned academic and research institution.

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

 

Celebrate Earth Day at the LSC

#CSUEarthWeek

Colorado State has so many green initiatives, we’ll need a whole week to celebrate sustainability. In honor of Earth Day, CSU dedicated the entire week following Earth Day to events that celebrate sustainability and environmentally conscientious practices.

The week kicked off with the Earth Day Festival, which took place in the Lory Student Center’s Sutherland Community Garden. This is an annual event that has grown each year, and this year’s festival featured a live band, The Salmon Famine, as well as multiple tables set up by different organizations. Housing & Dining Services had a compost display, Eco-Leaders had a sustainability board set up for students to make commitments to becoming more sustainable in their daily lives, and there were multiple informational booths and environmental petitions being circulated.

Colorado State is committed to sustainability every day of the year, but Earth Week highlights and informs the community about the ways the University stays dedicated to environmental initiatives on campus.

2018 Earth Day Festival: Eco Leaders and Warner College of Natural Resources tables

 

Evan Salzman, student and lead event programmer at RamEvents, explained the terrarium building activity at the RamEvents table. The activity allowed students to choose succulent plants and and pots to decorate with stones and shells. “We are looking to provide an enriching and entertaining experience for all CSU students on Earth Day. Activities like this really help students get interested and excited about sustainability and Earth Week,” Salzman said.

“We are looking to provide an enriching and entertaining experience for all CSU students on Earth Day. Activities like this really help students get interested and excited about sustainability and earth week.” – Evan Salzman, lead event programmer at RamEvents.

 

Colorado Sate is the first university in the world to have its sustainability efforts rewarded platinum twice by STARS (Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System). STARS is an independent program that measures comprehensive sustainability efforts at more than 800 universities around the world and is considered the most prestigious measurement of sustainability performance in higher education.

In embracing its sustainability mission, the LSC has pursued LEED certifications. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is an internationally recognized rating system for design, construction, and operation of high-performing sustainable buildings. There are four levels of certification under the LEED system: Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. The LSC currently has LEED Silver certifications for the North End (Transit Center); Central and South (Theatre) ; this establishes the LSC as a “green” building on campus. From creating more waste diversion options by composting to supporting the sustainable agriculture movement and by buying locally produced meats, cheeses, beers, and produce to serve in the Aspen Grille dining room, the LSC continues to make improvements toward sustainability, according to Facilities Management.

Areas in the LSC that are LEED certified:

  1. Transit Center: Achieved LEED Gold in 2007. First LEED Gold building on campus.
  2. Lory Student Center Revitalization: Achieved LEED Silver in 2016
  3. Lory Student Center Theatre Renovation: Achieved LEED for Commercial Interiors Gold in 2012

The 2013 LSC renovations also helped the building become more sustainable. Key outcomes from the LSC renovations include:

  • 17% energy cost reduction
  • 35% water use reduction
  • 56% of existing building maintained
  • 21% recycled/salvaged materials
  • 100% of the building’s electricity offset by the purchase of renewable energy credits (RECs)
  • Educational signage to create occupant awareness of the building’s high-performance features and green building strategy

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is dedicated to promoting a supportive, creative, and inclusive learning environment by developing campus community through a diversity of high‐quality, student‐centered programs and services.

Introducing Brand Markers to Illustrate Key Moments and Events

Brand Markers illustrating Colorado State’s history serve to draw attention to important developments in the University’s past. Brand Markers are four inch metal discs engraved with images that capture specific instances or represent an event or person.  They are ways to commemorate the CSU community as a whole outside of the Lory Student Center, and they celebrate accomplishments that directly affect the University’s community. Fort Collins and Colorado State have built their  communities and cultures around one another, and they have grown together since our land-grant university’s founding in 1870.

Each symbol  celebrates key moments and significant events  in the community’s past while promoting the land-grant mission. We are honored to be representing this shared history. Brand Markers are located throughout the LSC and we will be featuring a new set every two weeks on the website and the Digital Displays.

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Five Ways to Navigate the LSC

The Lory Student Center is home to many offices and events. There are six ballrooms, six lounges, 29 meeting rooms, several student services offices, and many other dining, studying, and relaxing areas – all in 350,000 square feet on three floors. In a building that serves so many purposes and sees thousands of visitors each day, even the most seasoned CSU students can have a difficult time navigating these halls. No worries; the LSC has you covered! Here are five resources to help you find your way.

No. 1: Kiosks

Seven kiosks are located throughout the building and can be found in areas that see heavy foot traffic. They include daily event notices and directional signage. Standing 7-feet tall, the kiosks are hard to miss and easy to read.

 

Your Trusted Resource for Navigating the LSC with Confidence-LSC Web Page

No. 2: Wayfinding Signage

When there are large events, or when the LSC is expecting several outside guests and community members, additional signage will be added to help with wayfinding. There is also permanent wayfinding signage along most intersecting hallways that display directional arrows and room numbers. Here’s a tip: The room numbers start lower at the south side of the building, and by the East Entrance, and increase as you head north or west through the building toward the Transit Center.

No. 3: Interactive Maps

Six of the interactive digital display screens in the building function as wayfinding maps. The interactive maps can be found at major entrance, and in areas that see heavy foot traffic. Just tap the screen, find and tap your destination, and the map will highlight the fastest route to take through the building. It’s a relatively new feature that is incredibly easy to use and time effective.

Locations of interactive maps:

  • Level 100 Transit Center main entrance, on the wall to the left of the Information Desk
  • Level 200 South Entrance, outside the Curfman Gallery
  • Level 200, outside the Ram Tech store
  • Level 200 West Entrance, next to the restrooms
  • Level 200 East Entrance, across from the Information Desk
  • Level  300 up the Main Staircase, to the left of the Event Planning offices

No. 4: LSC Staff Members

There are information desks located by the Level 200 East Entrance as well as in the Transit Center entrance on Level 100. The staff behind these desks are available to provide information, resources, and assistance to anyone in the LSC. If they do not know the answer, they will know whom to ask and where to look. In addition, the LSC is staffed with dedicated students and professionals ready to help serve and point you in the right direction. Just look for people sporting name badges because Rams help Rams, especially when they are lost!

No. 5: Online Building Maps

One way to prepare – before even entering the building – is to check out the online building maps here. Here’s a tip: Know the room number prior to coming into the building; this will help you navigate and will help you ask for directions. Check out the video below for a quick tour of the LSC to help you get started.

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Sutherland Community Garden and Fight Song & Alma Mater Wall

Featured Milestones

Locations: Lory Student Center Courtyard                          Wall across from the RamCard Office

Sutherland Community Garden

The Sutherland Community Garden, located in the center grass court of the Lory Student Center, features a plinth lawn and sculptures by alumnus Pard Morrison, donated by Tom and Jean Sutherland. The Ram Head Fountain features three original hand-carved ram heads from 1962. The LSC now hosts game-day celebrations before each home game in this garden.

The Sutherland Community Garden is named after Tom Sutherland( May 1930- July 2016)who is memorialized by the CSU community as an remarkable emeritus professor of animal sciences and a local philanthropist. Sutherland returned to the CSU community after being held for more than six years in captivity in Beirut. Sutherland was known for his generosity, optimism, kindness, and as a strong patron of the arts. The LSC has dedicated this space to remembering the strength, resilience, and sense of community that Sutherland inspired.

 

Fight Song and Alma Mater Wall

The CSU Fight Song and Alma Mater Wall are two “points of pride” in CSU traditions as outlined by Colorado State’s Alumni Association. The LSC prominently features both in each of the building’s main halls. The CSU Fight Song symbolizes school spirit at CSU. When you hear the CSU Fight Song, you should uphold tradition by standing up, singing along, and pumping your fist in the air when you get to the last line. The CSU Fight Song and Alma Matter Wall evoke this spirit and Ram Pride throughout the LSC.

CSU FIGHT SONG                                               

Fight on, you stalwart Ram Team,
on to the goal

Tear the (opponent’s nickname) line asunder
As down the field we thunder.
Knights of the Green and Gold,
Fight on with all your might.

Fight on, you stalwart Ram Team!
Fight! Fight! Fight!

CSU ALMA MATER
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater;
Colorado State.
Memories are everlasting
of this place so great.
May thy Green And Gold unite us,
loyal ever be.

Colorado State, our Alma Mater,
Hail, all Hail, to thee.

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Time to come together, Rams

‘I note the obvious differences between each sort and type, but we are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike. We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.’   Maya Angelou

Colorado State University and the Lory Student Center are not places for hate. We are a community that welcomes and encourages inclusion, respect, integrity, service, and social justice, according to the University’s Principles of Community.

After flyers from a white nationalist group related to neo-nazis and other white supremacy groups were found near the LSC, we as a community were disappointed, to say the least. Many Rams and members of the CSU community are targeted by these hateful messages. When some members of our community are threatened; we all are.

CSUnite is an all-university walk and community gathering to stand up for our university principles and demonstrate that CSU is No Place for Hate. All faculty, staff and students, and supporters of our Ram community are encouraged to come together at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 29, at Newton’s Corner (the sculpture at the intersection of Pitkin Street and Center Avenue, just south of the Behavioral Sciences Building). The event will begin with opening remarks followed by a short solidarity walk to the Lory Student Center Plaza. At the Plaza, there will be a brief program and opportunities for learning and action.

The Fort Collins and Colorado State University community march from Old Town Fort Collins to Colorado State University on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, January 18, 2016.

There is no place for such hate at Colorado State. We cannot move forward as a community unless we do so together.’President Tony Frank

This event is apart of the #NoPlace4H8 campaign run by Resident Life, and was introduced in President Tony Frank’s Spring Break Message to campus. “As much as our views and beliefs as members of the CSU community may differ on any  number of subjects, I am confident we are united on this front,” Frank said in the email. CSUnite is an event created to help us stand together as a community against hate and discriminatory ideologies. CSUnite is about showing that all differences aside, Rams take care of Rams.

More information about CSUnite can be found here. We are excited and hope to see all Rams on the plaza standing hand-in-hand.

 

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

TEDxCSU: ‘Ideas Worth Spreading’ Event asks audiences, ‘What if…?’

The Lory Student Center is excited to host the annual TEDxCSU event! This year’s theme is “What if…,” and takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 25 in the LSC Theatre and Grand Ballroom.

TEDxCSU is proud to be Northern Colorado’s only official TED event, and organizers are thrilled for the opportunity to bring CSU students, staff, and community members together in creative discussion. TEDxCSU is held throughout the LSC on CSU’s campus and strives to create a welcoming and inclusive atmosphere to share ideas.

This year’s TEDxCSU event will feature diverse speakers with unique topics, as well as a large Exhibit Hall highlighting Colorado businesses, entrepreneurs, and innovators. One ticket buys one person admission to the full-day event, lunch, hors d’oeuvres, refreshments, and unlimited access to creative, critical thinking and discussion.

Attendees explore Innovation Alley at the March 2016 TEDxCSU conference at Colorado State University.

“This event is important to RamEvents because it fits our values of education, diversity, collaboration, innovation, and community.  Sponsoring and promoting this kind of event really fit,” said Jensen Woods, RamEvents External Relations and Public Relations. “It also brings people together from all over the community, like students, staff, teachers, and community members, in one place and provokes a lot of thoughts in a very cool way.”

“It also brings people together from all over the community, like students, staff, teachers, and community members, in one place and provokes a lot of thoughts in a very cool way.”

“It’s important to bring different viewpoints and ways of thinking into focus, and that’s what TED events do. It works best if you have the personality and topics to present,” said Timothy Curry, who auditioned and is hoping to find out in the final round if he has made it. “Whether I make it or not, I’m still going to attend because I really think events like this are great and important,” he said.

Jaelyn Coates presents “White People, Enough: A Look at Power and Control” at the TEDxCSU March 2017 conference at Colorado State University.

The theme “What If…” hopes to encourage innovative thinking about different lifestyles. CSU is passionate about TED’s mission to deliver talks and information on a wide range of subjects. TEDxCSU has been an annual event for eight years, and this will be the fourth year the event has been sponsored by RamEvents.

Presenters include:

Ryan England: “Helping Others by Helping Yourself”
Kodi Phelps: “Does This Expression Make Me Look Fat? An Exploration of the Ways We Learn and Unlearn the Number on the Scale”
Joe Akmakjian: “Your Ability Does Not Define Your Humanity”
Anca Selariu: “Future of Life and the Importance of Being Unreasonable”
Alexis Kanda-Olmstead: “The Science of Women’s Leadership”
Ryan Pearson: “Solar Control Window Paint
Laura Pritchett: “Making Friends with Death? Heck, ya! (And why its important to do so now, when it seems so far away)”
Amy Hoeven: “Who I Am: A Virtual Reality Journey of Unity through the Stories of Refugee, Immigrant, and First Generation Students”
Charlie Vollmer: “Artificial Intelligence will never exist…but it’s so much more than that!”
Patrice Palmer, Emcee, Academic Advisor for the College of Business; Instructor and Coordinator for the Business Diversity Leadership Alliance

If you don’t yet have tickets, hurry before they’re sold out! Check out some of last year’s speakers and topics.

About the Lory Student Center
The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

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