Spotlight on Jerrel Siler

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Jerrel at the Statue of Liberty Monument on Liberty Island in July

Environmental Service Supervisor, LSC

 

What do you enjoy doing when you are not working?

When I have the free time, I like to get on the computer to either surf the internet or play a pc game.  After working a long day, I also like to do a little bit of running and lifting weights.

What are the values that drive you?

I like to live by the values that my previous department (Housing & Dining Services) have upheld and taught me: Customer-first service, being committed to both our students and staff members, upholding integrity, respect, and working as a team, creating an environment that welcomes all members in our community, innovation, and stewardship.

What has been your career progression? What have you learned at each step that has lead you to where you are today?

About five years ago I started as an hourly student working for Housing & Dining Services cleaning off-campus apartments, offices, and dining halls. Eventually I was hired as a state classified in November 2015 as an Environmental Service Technician Lead for Housing & Dining.  I worked in this position for two and a half years before I received the Environmental Service Supervisor position at Lory Student Center. What I have learned is that you never stop learning. Every day you can learn something new. I learned how to listen to people, whether it is listening to other staff members or listening to our students and guests. And lastly, I have learned how to stay positive, even on the chaotic days.

How do you maintain work/life balance?

Besides working as a full-time state classified employee, I am also a part-time CSU student. So to balance work and school, I try my best to plan about a week or two ahead and stick to a schedule or routine.

Where would you like to go on vacation if you had a month off and money was no object?

With Colorado being the most west that I have been in the United States, I would most likely take a month to explore the western half of the United States visiting Nevada, California, and Washington, to name a few. I would even try to visit Alaska and Hawaii if I had the time.

What are your career aspirations?

I would like to continue working at CSU once I graduate, as I love working here and I believe in our principles and values. As someone who loves to be around computers, my hope would be to get a career at CSU working with a team of software engineers once I graduate.

Tell us about your family, kids, hobbies.

Besides the computer and playing old-school video games, when time and money allows it, I like to travel to new places. I usually like to visit my close friends and family. Most of my family lives on the East Coast. I also have a two-year-old son.

What are some of your personal goals for the position you hold within the LSC?

One of my goals is to be committed to the staff members at Lory Student Center. I want to help all of us be as successful as possible in our positions by providing us with context and guidance to support us during the challenging times.

Spotlight on Emily Ambrose

Emily C. Ambrose
SLiCE, Assistant Director Training and Development
Pronouns: She/Hers

What do you enjoy doing when you are not working?
This is cliché: I incredibly enjoy working! I get to live my purpose, work with others who have shaped me along the way, and strive to positively impact those with whom I come in contact. And, when I’m not working, I cuddle with my dog Stella, I Salsa dance, I binge-watch Netflix (most recently “Madam Secretary”), and love on the people who mean most to me.

What are the values that drive you?
Personally, I feel very connected to our CSU Principles of Community.  In addition to the five interwoven values, I hold JOY, inclusion, adventure, and self-awareness very highly.

What has been your career progression? What have you learned at each step that has lead you to where you are today?
This is a HUGE question!  How long do I have?

To keep it short and sweet:

  • Knew I wanted to be in education when I did a project on Teen Pregnancy
  • Serving as a Fraternity & Sorority Life Student Coordinator at CU Boulder (with John Henderson!)
  • Collegiate Leadership Consultant for an international sorority
  • Graduate School at CSU/Graduate Coordinator for the President’s Leadership Program
  • Program Coordinator in SLiCE
  • Assistant Director for the Pride Resource Center
  • Assistant Director for Training & Development in SLiCE for the LSC … PHEW!

Some general lessons I learned:

  • Be kind, genuine, and as transparent as possible
  • Apologize when necessary; own impact
  • Show up for people and follow-through (still working on this)
  • If at all possible, continue to love what you do each day
  • When you’re stressed, practice gratitude (thanks, Anupama!)

How do you maintain work/life balance?
I have mixed feelings about the statement and concept. However, I find joy in my life inside and outside of CSU by doing the following:

– Ensuring there are things in my future to look forward to

– Remembering my relationships are ultimately what are important in life

– Maintaining some very rewarding side-hustles, which include raft guiding, couples coaching, and wedding officiating

Where would you like to go on vacation if you had a month off and money was no object?
To CSU’s Todos Santos Center in Mexico to practice and learn more Spanish.

What are your career aspirations?
Be in the present and say YES to opportunities which come and make sense for where I am in life. To cultivate and sustained sense of JOY and PURPOSE in my life and the lives of others.

What are some of your personal goals for the position you hold within the LSC?
I want to build on the foundation already created by the folks in the LSC working on training and development. I hope to infuse the Principles of Community into the ways we develop our student leaders – finding purpose and meaning in each of the jobs in and for the Lory Student Center.

The LSC at Sea: Welcoming, Affirming & Engaging

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Executive Director of the Lory Student Center Mike Ellis took the 2018 Spring Semester to voyage around the world as the Dean of Student Life  on the Semester at Sea ‘s ship The World Odyssey 

by Jayla Hodge

 

 Running a building as large and as functional as the Lory Student Center is no small task. While the responsibility is held by many departments, the symbolical captain of the LSC is its Executive Director. Mike Ellis has served as the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Executive Director of Lory Student Center  for more than 18 years. He is an essential part of the LSC and Colorado State community, and this past semester, he made a bold move – to voyage around the world with Semester at Sea.

Leaving a landlocked mentality, his home, and his role at Colorado State behind was no easy feat. While it was a smooth semester here at the LSC without the director, he was still missed. Now he has returned home with new experiences, lessons, and tales from 11 countries, 14 cities and four continents. And he is ready to share.

 

Photos by Maria Ellis-at the Great Wall of China

Life at Sea

In the beginning of January, Ellis, with his wife and son, packed their bags, locked up their house, and said goodbye to their dog. After a year of preparation, they were on their way to San Diego to embark on a Semester at Sea voyage.

“My interest was the opportunity to travel all around the world with students. I had the opportunity to listen and see the world through the eyes of students, students from different parts of the world themselves,” he said.

He would also play a responsible role onboard The World Odyssey as the Dean of Student Life, a job with duties not much different than his back at the LSC.

“The skills and experiences I have were all transferable. The ship itself is like a Lory Student Center but on the water,” Ellis said. “The mission on the ship was to welcome, engage, and affirm every single student, and I like to think that’s the same mission for the Lory Student Center, that every student that comes through the doors is welcomed, affirmed, and engaged in some capacity within the CSU community.”

The voyage was 101 days and approximately half of that was spent on the ship covering about 28,000 nautical miles. The other half was in port at 13 land locations.

“People start to refer to the ship as a port, it becomes the ’14th’ port in a way. The ship itself definitely became a favorite port of mine. The comfort, the people, and the learning that occurs with this incredible group of people from across the world make it amazing,”Ellis said.

Letting go to Embrace Life

Letting go and living in the moment was a central theme in Ellis’s journey. He even partook in the King Neptune Day celebrations and a line crossing ceremony that involves the tradition of shaving your head when you cross the equator. He didn’t just shave his own head, but the heads of other students. Talk about letting go.

Even with so much adventure and excitement, there are always challenges that come with big adjustments.

“The biggest challenge for me was just being away from the normal everyday life. There is a period of time where you just have to let that go. Just allowing myself to be immersed  in the moment and not think about what’s happening back at home, on campus, or what’s going on in the Student Center. It was not an easy thing to do.”Ellis said the experience of visiting the Great Wall of China really embodied the essence of his travels.

“We were hiking with a group of students for two days along the Great Wall. It was incredible. As we stood on top of it, I just pinched myself and said, ‘Wow, am I really standing here?’ It was something I never thought I would do in my life,” he said.

 

 

Lessons From the Voyage

 

Coming from a small community like Fort Collins to larger cities and countries around the world such as Ghana, South Africa, Mauritius, India, Myanmar, Vietnam, China, Japan, Morocco, and Portugal as a bit of a culture shock for Ellis. During his time as a seafarer, he said he came across both positive and negative experiences. 

“There were experiences where you would have this mix of emotions – watching happiness in people’s eyes and knowing the privilege we have living in the U.S. that we don’t always recognize until you go to a place like that, and see children living in proverty,” Ellis said. “It’s hard trying to figure out how to carry that, especially in a way that actually makes a difference.”

There were students from 48 states and more than 35 countries. For students, coming from different cultures and walks of life, the power of the trip was to see and experience a wide range of cultures, and for them to grasp the privilege of being able to do so from a ship like The World Odyssey, Ellis said.

“Just the ability to be on a ship of that magnitude sailing around the world brings with it privilege that we had as participants and voyagers on the ship that others living in those countries did not have. I think whether students want to acknowledge it or not, they had to by just being present. That also includes nonstudents like myself.”

 

 

“It is possible for anyone that has the desire, ambition, and creativity to put together resources to sail around the world. You have to do it; you have to experience it. The vitality and perspective, it’s an investment worth doing.” 

The biggest lesson of all: You never know as much as you think you know about people and places until you get there and experience it. Ellis emphasized that everyone, and particularly students, should take the opportunity to travel and to truly expand their world perspective.

“Going back to the Great Wall story. It was a relatively short time and there were millions of people involved. You could read about [the Great Wall] all you want, but until you get there and see it you don’t comprehend the magnitude,” Ellis said enthusiastically. “I think this is true with so many different things, whether it is the Great Wall or children playing in Ghana, to see and experience the people, to touch it, smell it, to hear it, just everything. You can’t get it any other way.”

 

 Details of the Voyage

The ship, The World Odyssey, consisted of nine decks, including an engine room, kitchens and storage, the Captain’s Bridge, recreational areas, meeting rooms, and sleeping cabins. Just imagine – the LSC on the water – only with sleeping cabins and surrounded by the sea! CSU’s Principles of Community served as a grounding philosophy for the Student Life team, with a goal of “welcoming, engaging, and affirming” every single student on the ship, not unlike their mission at the LSC.

By the numbers:

    • 101 days
    • 536 students
    • 77 faculty and staff
    • 177 crew
    • 13 ports, 11 countries, 14 cities and 4 continents
    • Students from 48 states, 33 countries and 193 universities
    • $2.5 million in financial aid awarded

 

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Ram Head Fountain and Water Fountain Quotes Milestones

Featured Milestones

Locations: North side of Sutherland Community Garden, above major water fountains near restrooms

Ram Head Fountain

Housed in Sutherland Community Garden, in the northwest corner of the Lory Student Center Courtyard, are three Ram Head Fountains that were part of the original building, which was constructed in 1962. Initially there were seven Ram Heads, but four were damaged over the years. The current sculptures were preserved during the LSC renovation for inclusion in the Courtyard. The Ram Heads are hand carved and were designed by the same man who created the original Venetian Glass Tiles installations now adorning the Main Staircase.

 

Water Fountain Quotes

There are a total of seven Water Fountain Quotes throughout the revitalized LSC that display individual quotes from many of Colorado State’s distinguished presidents. The Water Fountain Quotes serve as a way to commemorate the University’s influential leaders. In recent years, additional Water Fountain Quotes have been added to include quotes from vice presidents.

  • Level 100 west bathrooms across from the Ramskeller, quote by 1st President Elijah E. Edwards
  • Level 200 west entrance bathrooms, quote by 12th President Albert C. Yates
  • Level 20 west/east corridor bathrooms across from the Information Desk, quote by 14th President Tony Frank
  • Level 200 LSC Theatre restrooms, quote by 1st Vice President of Diversity Mary Ontiveros
  • Level 200 south entrance across from Intermissions coffee shop, Quote by Vice President of Student Affairs Blanche Hughes
  • Level 300 across down central hallway past the SDPS offices, quote by 8th President William E. Morgan
  • Level 300 bathrooms and fountains beginning if the hall next to the event planning offices, quote by 5th President Charles A. Lory

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Get to know the LSC Brand Markers: University Seal and Extension

Featured Brand Markers

Location: South Exterior Wall of Ballroom C, South Exterior Wall of Ballroom A

Colorado State University Seal reflects Land-Grant Mission

The CSU Seal closely resembles the state of Colorado seal, but the University’s seal includes the words education, service, extension, and research that highlight  attributes the University finds most reflective of the land-grant mission. Both seals contain the eye of god within a pyramid, which is placed above a bundle of elm rods bound together with a projecting axe blade. The axe blade represents strength, authority, and leadership; qualities that both CSU and the state of Colorado have identified as important in their dedication to progress.

Since its founding in 1870, CSU has experienced a few name changes. Colorado Agricultural College welcomed its first students in 1879, and by 1935, the University was known as Colorado State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (Colorado A&M). Eventually the school was renamed in 1957 to Colorado State University, and offered a diverse curriculum and more advanced degrees.

 

Extension Services:

In 1879, the Extension Services of Colorado State University were established as early off-campus farmers’ institutions. Throughout the century, services provided by Extension Services have been essential to the survival of the communities within the state, especially during the Great Depression. Extension Services has created programs through a combination of local and federal government aid, and helped with the the dissemination of important agricultural and home economic information that improved the quality of life throughout the state. By attending to the issues of rural populations, projects like the Human Wildlife Interaction Program and Water Management Project prove that the effects of the CSU’s Extension Services have been far-reaching.

 

 

LSC Late Nite Spring 2018

Finals week is upon us, and the LSC has you covered for late night study sessions! To help students through exams, the Lory Student Center will be a Late Nite retreat for students to indulge in relaxing study environments, fun activities, and great deals for both food and coffee. From Sunday, May 6, through Wednesday, May 9, the LSC will offer 50% off of food during extended dining services hours – 7 p.m. to midnight – from various food court vendors each day, as well as 50% off coffee at Sweet Sinsations and Intermissions from 7 to 10 p.m.

If you need a quiet place to focus, the LSC offers reserved rooms specifically for studying. The building is open until midnight each night to accommodate late study sessions. The Laptop and Technology Check-Out Desk will have extended hours (until 10 p.m. Sunday and until midnight Monday through Wednesday) for your convenience. The list of reserved rooms can be found here.

Finals week is a stressful time, so Late Nite also offers students some de-stressing activities such as free massages and a social media giveaway. Keep up with the social media giveaway on the LSC’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to find out how you can win the contest and the prize: a brand new tailgating grill. Use the hashtag #ThePlacetoBe to stay connected and check out other LSC Late Nite activities.

Each day has different study room availability and coffee and food deals; view the full schedule below:

Saturday, May 5: (Study Rooms only)

Study Rooms: (8 a.m. to midnight)

  • LSC 226-228
  • LSC 300
  • LSC 304-06
  • LSC 308-10
  • LSC 312
  • LSC 322
  • LSC 324
  • LSC 328-30
  • LSC 372-74
  • LSC 382
  • LSC 386

Sunday, May 6:

Dining Services Deals:

50% off That’s a Wrap from 7 p.m. to midnight.

50% off coffee at Sweet Sinsations from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Study Rooms: (11 a.m. to midnight)

  • LSC 226-228
  • LSC 300
  • LSC 304-06
  • LSC 308-10
  • LSC 312
  • LSC 322
  • LSC 324
  • LSC 328-30
  • LSC 372-74
  • LSC 382
  • LSC 386
  • LSC 390
  • LSC 392

Monday, May 7:

Dining Services Deals:

50% off at Subway from 7 p.m. to midnight.

50% off coffee at Intermissions from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Massages: 6 to 10 p.m., SLiCE Conference Room (LSC 212)

Study Rooms: (8 a.m. to midnight)

  • LSC 226-228
  • LSC 300
  • LSC 308
  • LSC 312
  • LSC 322
  • LSC 328-30
  • LSC 376-78
  • LSC 380
  • LSC 386
  • LSC 390
  • LSC 392

Tuesday, May 8:

Dining Services Deals:

50% off at Garbanzo Express from 7 p.m. to midnight.

50% off coffee at Sweet Sinsations from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Massages: 6 to 10 p.m., SLiCE Conference Room (LSC 212)

Study Rooms: (8 a.m. to midnight)

  • LSC 226-228
  • LSC 300
  • LSC 304-06
  • LSC 308-10
  • LSC 324
  • LSC 328-30
  • LSC 372-74
  • LSC 376-78
  • LSC 382
  • LSC 386
  • LSC 390
  • LSC 392

Wednesday, May 9:

Dining Services Deals:

50% off at Bagel Place from 7 p.m. to midnight.

50% off coffee at Intermissions from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Study Rooms: (8 a.m. to midnight)

  • LSC 226-228
  • LSC 300
  • LSC 304-06
  • LSC 324
  • LSC 328-30
  • LSC 372-74
  • LSC 376-78
  • LSC 382
  • LSC 386
  • LSC 390

Thursday, May 10: (Study Rooms only)

Study Rooms: (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

  • LSC 324
  • LSC 372-74
  • LSC 376-78
  • LSC 390

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

 

Land-Grant Wall and Lincoln Mural

Featured Milestones

 

Level 200, near the Food Court; and along West Staircase – Lory Student Center

Land-Grant Wall and Lincoln Mural – Lory Student Center

The Morrill Act, proposed by Vermont Senator Justin Smith Morrill, was ground-breaking legislation signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862. It created the nation’s Land-Grant University system. According to the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, these institutions focused on teaching agriculture, military tactics, science and mechanical arts, as well as classical studies, which included the study of language, literature, history, and art of ancient cultures. Land-Grant Universities were originally created as engines of the American Dream; they created access to educational opportunities for all citizens of all classes.

Colorado State, Colorado’s only land-grant institution, celebrated the Act’s 150th anniversary in 2012. The Lincoln and Land-Grant Walls, located in the Lory Student Center, pay tribute to this act and the University’s history. Colorado State is still defined as a modern day land-grant college with prominent programs in agriculture, biology, veterinary medicine, chemistry, and many other programs that have helped establish CSU as a world-renowned academic and research institution.

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

 

Celebrate Earth Day at the LSC

#CSUEarthWeek

Colorado State has so many green initiatives, we’ll need a whole week to celebrate sustainability. In honor of Earth Day, CSU dedicated the entire week following Earth Day to events that celebrate sustainability and environmentally conscientious practices.

The week kicked off with the Earth Day Festival, which took place in the Lory Student Center’s Sutherland Community Garden. This is an annual event that has grown each year, and this year’s festival featured a live band, The Salmon Famine, as well as multiple tables set up by different organizations. Housing & Dining Services had a compost display, Eco-Leaders had a sustainability board set up for students to make commitments to becoming more sustainable in their daily lives, and there were multiple informational booths and environmental petitions being circulated.

Colorado State is committed to sustainability every day of the year, but Earth Week highlights and informs the community about the ways the University stays dedicated to environmental initiatives on campus.

2018 Earth Day Festival: Eco Leaders and Warner College of Natural Resources tables

 

Evan Salzman, student and lead event programmer at RamEvents, explained the terrarium building activity at the RamEvents table. The activity allowed students to choose succulent plants and and pots to decorate with stones and shells. “We are looking to provide an enriching and entertaining experience for all CSU students on Earth Day. Activities like this really help students get interested and excited about sustainability and Earth Week,” Salzman said.

“We are looking to provide an enriching and entertaining experience for all CSU students on Earth Day. Activities like this really help students get interested and excited about sustainability and earth week.” – Evan Salzman, lead event programmer at RamEvents.

 

Colorado Sate is the first university in the world to have its sustainability efforts rewarded platinum twice by STARS (Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System). STARS is an independent program that measures comprehensive sustainability efforts at more than 800 universities around the world and is considered the most prestigious measurement of sustainability performance in higher education.

In embracing its sustainability mission, the LSC has pursued LEED certifications. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is an internationally recognized rating system for design, construction, and operation of high-performing sustainable buildings. There are four levels of certification under the LEED system: Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. The LSC currently has LEED Silver certifications for the North End (Transit Center); Central and South (Theatre) ; this establishes the LSC as a “green” building on campus. From creating more waste diversion options by composting to supporting the sustainable agriculture movement and by buying locally produced meats, cheeses, beers, and produce to serve in the Aspen Grille dining room, the LSC continues to make improvements toward sustainability, according to Facilities Management.

Areas in the LSC that are LEED certified:

  1. Transit Center: Achieved LEED Gold in 2007. First LEED Gold building on campus.
  2. Lory Student Center Revitalization: Achieved LEED Silver in 2016
  3. Lory Student Center Theatre Renovation: Achieved LEED for Commercial Interiors Gold in 2012

The 2013 LSC renovations also helped the building become more sustainable. Key outcomes from the LSC renovations include:

  • 17% energy cost reduction
  • 35% water use reduction
  • 56% of existing building maintained
  • 21% recycled/salvaged materials
  • 100% of the building’s electricity offset by the purchase of renewable energy credits (RECs)
  • Educational signage to create occupant awareness of the building’s high-performance features and green building strategy

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is dedicated to promoting a supportive, creative, and inclusive learning environment by developing campus community through a diversity of high‐quality, student‐centered programs and services.

Come Celebrate the LSC Birthday

Wishing the Lory Student Center a Happy Birthday!

In honor of the LSC’s “Big 56” April 18, the Lory Student Center Governing Board will host a birthday celebration from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 18, on the Plaza near the LSC East Entrance. Free cake will handed out by members of the LSC Governing Board on a first-come, first-served basis. With a total of 12 large cakes from catering, a Banner Signing Station for students to write what they love about the LSC, lots of balloons, and the Directors of the LSC Governing Board handing out free LSC swag – the celebration will be hard to miss!

“The ‘Big 56’ represents another year of serving students; we are celebrating our students and all we’ve accomplished at the LSC this year. The celebration is done annually, usually around mid-April, as a pick-me-up for students,” Olivia Hirota, Director of Marketing for the LSC Governing Board, said.

“We definitely encourage all our directors and students to come celebrate. Robert Peters and Lance Wright, the Business Services and Campus Activities directors respectively, are standing in for Executive Director Mike Ellis [who is at Semester at Sea] and will be on the plaza at 1:30 p.m. for the main cake cutting. That will be the only decorated cake, and it’s really symbolic to have them there. Its also important for students to see who their leadership is,” Hirota said.

There also will be applications available for students who would like to get involved in or join the Governing Board. Events like the LSC Birthday and the building expos are some of the ways the Governing Board connects with the students and lets them know about resources available to them. The Lory Student Center was first located in Johnson Hall (1936-62) and known as the Student Union; the original Student Center was conceived on a drawing board in 1955 in response to quickly rising enrollments and the changing requirements of an influx of students.

Today, the LSC now sees up to 45,000 visitors each day, and was ranked on of the top 10 student centers in the nation by the New York Times. It continues to grow and serve students, so come celebrate another successful year with the building and LSC community.

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

Introducing Brand Markers to Illustrate Key Moments and Events

Brand Markers illustrating Colorado State’s history serve to draw attention to important developments in the University’s past. Brand Markers are four inch metal discs engraved with images that capture specific instances or represent an event or person.  They are ways to commemorate the CSU community as a whole outside of the Lory Student Center, and they celebrate accomplishments that directly affect the University’s community. Fort Collins and Colorado State have built their  communities and cultures around one another, and they have grown together since our land-grant university’s founding in 1870.

Each symbol  celebrates key moments and significant events  in the community’s past while promoting the land-grant mission. We are honored to be representing this shared history. Brand Markers are located throughout the LSC and we will be featuring a new set every two weeks on the website and the Digital Displays.

 

About the Lory Student Center

The Lory Student Center is proud to foster an environment that honors and respects all members of the University community, and creates a friendly, inviting destination for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and guests. We are proud to be the gathering place for the campus community, and to offer vibrant social, educational, recreational, and cultural activities that stimulate discussion and debate.

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